Image

On the heels of a drug bust that yielded $10,000 worth of narcotics, the Kappa Sigma fraternity at Tulane University – or more specifically, two Kappa Sigma pledges at Tulane – found themselves on the wrong side of the law once again.

On Feb. 28 the Tulane student newspaper, The Hullabaloo, ran a front-page article documenting the Feb. 22 drug raid of the Kappa Sigma house and the arrest of two Kappa Sigma fraternity brothers; sophomores Wyatt Silverman and Jules Staib.

Silverman and Staib, both 19 and Tulane students, were arrested after they accepted a package containing 107 grams of ecstasy (MDMA) from undercover state police officers. The other drugs seized included 57 dosage units of LSD, 69 grams of psilocybin Mushrooms, 48 grams of opium, 22 grams of marijuana, .80 grams of Cocaine and .91 grams of DMT.

All told, the drug bust totaled $10,000.

However, before anyone had a chance to read the print edition of The Hullabaloo on Feb. 28 that detailed the drug bust at the Kappa Sigma house, two Kappa Sigma fraternity pledges –  Jason Polsky and Alexander Montiel – lifted more than 2,000 copies of The Hullabaloo’s Feb. 28 issue and deposited them into a recycling bin in a rather ill-advised attempt to “cover-up” the story.

Not surprisingly, they were caught in the act of doing this misguided deed (as seen below):

Image

To quote The Hullabaloo’s story, “Hullabaloo Distribution Manager James Arney first discovered the two pledges’ theft after finding multiple bundles of newspapers, moved from the Lavin-Bernick Center loading dock, in a nearby trash receptacle. Soon after, Hullabaloo staff writer Sam Fishman saw and took a cell phone picture of Polsky and Montiel disposing of more newspapers near Phelps House.

“I saw them walking with two stacks of paper in each hand, so I followed them,” Fishman said. “I saw them open the recycling bins behind Phelps, and one guy threw it in.”

TUPD later used the photo to identify Polsky and Montiel.

Polsky and Montiel have agreed to pay $1,896 to The Hullabaloo to fully cover the cost of the stolen copies of the newspaper, valued at $1 per copy after the first two issues.

Oddly enough, this isn’t the first time an incident like this has occurred on a college campus. Last spring the University of Florida experienced a similar problem, while the University of Alabama has also dealt with the same issue from time to time.

Not surprisingly every time something like this has occurred, it has been a Greek organization that has been the guilty party in terms of stealing newspapers and disposing of them before anyone has had a chance to read said article or articles.

Luckily for us – and not so lucky for them – we now live in a digital age. So take note Johnny Fraternity; stealing newspapers doesn’t help. It only makes you look even more stupid than you did before.

Image

Advertisements